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While You Were Sleeping Episode 6 Recap





EPISODE 6

 

Hong-joo comes back to the coffee shop, wandering around in a daze because she can’t see through her foggy glasses. Jae-chan guides her over, and then his eyes widen when she suddenly grabs his face to put ointment on his burn.

They each complain about how ungrateful Seung-won and So-yoon are when they went through so much to save them, and Jae-chan softens as he watches her tend to his wound. When she asks for his finger next, he quickly turns around and rips off the band-aid he just put there himself. That’s adorable.

Hong-joo says that other people might not know how much he went through to save his brother, but she does, and that he did a good job. He smiles at that and tells her that she did a good job too.

They look out at the street, where the rain begins to fall and a man runs past, which transports us to another flashback 13 years ago. Dad ran for cover from the rain, and was startled when Jae-chan showed up next to him.

Jae-chan had said sheepishly that he’d aim for more than subsistence living, not even knowing what it meant, and Dad realized that he was awake that night on the roof and heard everything he’d said.

Back in the present, Jae-chan asks Hong-joo why she doesn’t wear contacts, thinking that she looked uncomfortable with foggy glasses. She just interprets this as another sign that he’s fallen for her, wiggling her glasses around and wondering why he cares. He refuses to just tell her that she looks prettier without them.

 

She asks what he’s going to do about So-yoon’s father, expecting him to charge him properly for his crimes. But to her shock, Jae-chan says the case is already closed and his brother was saved, so that’s that.

She can’t believe he’s planning to let it go just because of his caseload and his fear of getting fired, but Jae-chan whines that he has three years left on payments for a car he wrecked because of her. She rattles off a string of numbers in response, telling him that they’re this week’s lottery numbers.

He scoffs, insulted that she thinks he’d decide what to say or do based on how much money he had. He leaves in a huff, and once he’s gone, she swoons at his response.

Jae-chan runs into Yoo-bum, who offers to buy him lunch now that their case is closed. But Jae-chan says he hasn’t finalized the paperwork, saying that he found things that require further investigation. Yoo-bum’s temper flares at that, and he says that Jae-chan won’t find anything no matter how much he digs.

Yoo-bum says he knows Jae-chan’s every move, and Jae-chan replies, “Do you know what’s scarier than not knowing? Thinking you know everything.”

Jae-chan’s smile fades into an icy glare and he stalks off… only to hide behind a car around the corner, wondering why he went and said such a thing. He tries to calm his racing heart and repeats Hong-joo’s lottery numbers to himself, ha.

Jae-chan arrives at the office just in time to stop the paperwork from being delivered to his boss, and he grabs So-yoon’s father’s case file to restart the investigation. The chief prosecutor notes this and calls him in, and Jae-chan chants the lotto numbers on the way like it’s a prayer.

The boss tells him to close the case, accusing him of digging his heels in because of his personal grudge against Yoo-bum. Jae-chan says it’s okay if the chief prosecutor thinks that, as long as he can stop this case from returning to them in the future as an even bigger crime. He vows to reexamine all of the past charges against So-yoon’s father.

The boss loses his temper, and the gossip spreads rapidly. The other prosecutors wonder if Jae-chan won the lotto or something, to make him act out like this.

 

Jae-chan test-drives a shiny new car later that day, and he stops to brag to Hong-joo about reopening the case. She beams proudly and wonders why he argued when he was going to do the right thing anyway, and then gasps when she sees the car. “You’re not… buying that because of those lotto numbers I lied about, are you?” she asks nervously.

Jae-chan tries not to let the shock show on his face, and lies that he totally knew she was kidding. She asks if he restarted the case because of the lotto numbers, and he reminds her that he’s not the kind of person to let money determine his actions.

He trips over his own feet on his way back to the car, and tells the salesman in a deflated voice that he’ll buy the car… someday.

 

Fellow prosecutor Hee-min jumps when she gets caught gossiping about Jae-chan, not realizing that he was brooding in the dark room over his worthless lottery ticket, which he rips up.

He asks her about So-yoon’s father, as she was the one who dropped the case the last time he was charged. Hee-min says she doesn’t regret it, because domestic violence cases aren’t so cut and dry, and the choice should be up to the victim. Them indicting the husband is passing judgment on a situation they don’t understand, she says, and not knowing the difference between justice and acting brave means that he doesn’t have the right to be a prosecutor.

Jae-chan looks down at his ID tag as he thinks over her words, and the camera spins around him and takes us back to that rainy day 13 years ago. I love the transitions in this drama.

Inside a convenience store, Jae-chan had asked Dad what he wanted him to grow up to be. Before he could answer, a soldier had entered the store, and Dad noticed it right away—the nasty end of a large rifle, sticking out of the duffle bag on his shoulder.

Dad asked Jae-chan to run home and fetch his cell phone, saying that he’d forgotten it, and on his way out, Dad stopped him to answer, “A prosecutor. I’d have no other wishes if you became a prosecutor.” Jae-chan agreed on the spot and stepped outside with the umbrella that his father had just bought him.

Dad’s smile faded as he looked behind him at the soldier, the same young man who got on Hong-joo’s father’s bus in her flashback. Later this very day, in fact.

Jae-chan was waiting to cross the street when he heard the sound of gunshots, stopping him cold. He turned around as the soldier fled the scene, everything happening in slow motion.

He ran inside to find Dad bleeding on the ground, and broke down in tears.

 

As we see the other half of the funeral for the people killed by that solider, Jae-chan narrates, “I knew it then, that my father had made a choice. He sacrificed himself to save other people, and the world called him a hero. But through that choice, my mother lost a husband, and Seung-won and I lost a father. Rather than feeling proud, I resented that choice. To the world, my father’s choice was justice, but to me, it was just acting brave.”

Back in the present, Jae-chan comes out of his reverie to find Woo-tak staring at him in wonder. He introduces himself as the guy from the Valentine’s Day accident, and offers to buy Jae-chan dinner to thank him. They find out that they’re the same age, and Woo-tak suggests banmal but Jae-chan shuts him down, ha.

So-yoon helps out at Hong-joo’s restaurant, clearly feeling bad about imposing but not willing to admit it. Hong-joo says she’s a lot like someone else she knows, thinking of Jae-chan’s habit of speaking badly when he’s nice at heart.

Seung-won grabs the dishes out of So-yoon’s hands and barks at Hong-joo, calling her “ajumma,” and sniping that a pianist can’t get her hands hurt. He throws in a little wink at So-yoon for good measure, making her smile.

Woo-tak leads Jae-chan to Hong-joo’s restaurant, surprised to run into her again. Wait, is this really a coincidence? No way…

Woo-tak says he regretted not asking her name the other night when he gave her a ride, and she agrees to use banmal when she finds out that they’re the same age. Woo-tak says very easily that she looks prettier without her glasses and jokes that they’re the Three Flying Dragons, since they were all born in the year of the dragon, and Jae-chan looks annoyed that Hong-joo is so friendly and giggly with Woo-tak.

At the same time, Yoo-bum finds out where So-yoon and her mother are hiding and turns his car around.

Seung-won is the one who ends up serving Woo-tak and Jae-chan, slamming the dishes onto the table with a whole lot of emotion behind it. Jae-chan snaps that he told him not to get involved in So-yoon’s life, and Seung-won just ignores him.

Woo-tak says he expected them to be very affectionate brothers, and Jae-chan is surprised that he knows they’re brothers. He guesses that this isn’t a coincidence, and Woo-tak says that’s what he’s curious about—whether it’s coincidence or fate. He grabs Jae-chan’s hand as he says it, ha, making it look like a very different conversation.

Woo-tak wonders to himself if things will really happen according to his dream, in which he’d come to this restaurant with his partner, and run into Jae-chan by chance on the way. He looks around and notes that everything else is the same, except he changed one small thing—he brought Jae-chan here instead of his partner.

Jae-chan asks him to stop playing around and admit that this isn’t a coincidence, but Woo-tak holds up his hand and thinks that if his dream is right, someone will walk through the door in five seconds. He counts down, and Yoo-bum walks in right on cue.

Hong-joo steps in front of So-yoon and her mother protectively, and Yoo-bum says he’s not here to see her tonight, but to speak to his client’s family.

Woo-tak gapes to see everything happen the way he’d seen it in his dream, and tells Jae-chan that it’s definitely fate, and not coincidence.

Woo-tak thinks to himself, “I’m curious to know if the one trivial thing I changed will be able to stop the horrible thing that’s about to happen.”

 

EPILOGUE

The episode closes with a shot of Jae-chan’s father’s columbarium, which fills with pictures of his family in the same way that Hong-joo’s father’s did. Among them are Jae-chan’s real report cards and all the selfies he takes, like the one showing off his prosecutor’s badge.

COMMENTS

Even with today’s movie-title-as-episode-title, “Covertly, Grandly,” I wasn’t expecting Woo-tak to be a seer hiding in our midst. I thought maybe Woo-tak would turn out to be evil, not a fellow dream-seer! That was a great twist, and I’m excited by what this could mean for the larger story, since we now know that the premonitions aren’t limited to our leads. I’m still not convinced that he’s entirely good—I mean, he seems like a very nice cop, but then he has these moments where his motivations feel purposely ambiguous. In any case, it’s starting to look like he’s a possible love interest, and a very big slice of the mystery pie. Did he start having these dreams recently, like Jae-chan did? Does it have to do with their proximity to Hong-joo, or something else? And if Jae-chan and Hong-joo are connected through the deaths of their fathers, how does Woo-tak figure into this? Is he connected to another victim, or maybe the soldier? It can’t be coincidence that all three of them are the same age, either.

Jae-chan definitely got the more moving backstory, but it’s because of how good his father was (why are all good drama parents destined to die?). After their argument at the police station, I wasn’t expecting such a sweet father-son relationship, with Dad sticking up for him and taking the brunt of the punishment from Mom for his sake. I can see now why Jae-chan is so eager to fulfill his father’s last wish at all costs, and also why he’s reluctant to risk himself to save others. But it’s just in his nature to end up doing it anyway, because you can’t grow up with a father like that and not be good at heart.

I loved that Little Bro was a sassypants as a kid too; he seems to have taken over Mom’s role in being Jae-chan’s moral compass, and it’s great (and entertaining) that he will point out just how much of a dumbass his brother is being. Of course, he has the luxury of thinking in absolutes because he’s not worried about the rent or accidentally having killed a man in everyone’s dreams. But Jae-chan was clearly in need of a wakeup call if he thought his father wanted him to become a prosecutor in name and not actually do a good job of upholding justice. The lottery bit was funny, but it also spoke to the heart of the problem, both in him and in the system—that he really was hampered from doing what he thought was right for fear of losing his job. It seems ridiculous that pursuing one case means risking your neck, but I suppose there’s a small hope in that too, that all it takes is one stubborn prosecutor to keep a case alive.

The opening sequence was definitely the highlight of the episode, with everyone racing to the same place to stop a disaster from happening, and such personal stakes in preventing it. That’s what’s kept the premonitions really riveting thus far—because they’re connected to our main characters on a personal level, which keeps the urgency and our investment very high. I hope that continues to be the case in every episode, even if it’s a terrible thing to do, putting all our characters in one place, foretelling imminent disaster, and leaving us hanging. That’s just mean.

EPISODE 6

 

Hong-joo comes back to the coffee shop, wandering around in a daze because she can’t see through her foggy glasses. Jae-chan guides her over, and then his eyes widen when she suddenly grabs his face to put ointment on his burn.

They each complain about how ungrateful Seung-won and So-yoon are when they went through so much to save them, and Jae-chan softens as he watches her tend to his wound. When she asks for his finger next, he quickly turns around and rips off the band-aid he just put there himself. That’s adorable.

Hong-joo says that other people might not know how much he went through to save his brother, but she does, and that he did a good job. He smiles at that and tells her that she did a good job too.

They look out at the street, where the rain begins to fall and a man runs past, which transports us to another flashback 13 years ago. Dad ran for cover from the rain, and was startled when Jae-chan showed up next to him.

Jae-chan had said sheepishly that he’d aim for more than subsistence living, not even knowing what it meant, and Dad realized that he was awake that night on the roof and heard everything he’d said.

Back in the present, Jae-chan asks Hong-joo why she doesn’t wear contacts, thinking that she looked uncomfortable with foggy glasses. She just interprets this as another sign that he’s fallen for her, wiggling her glasses around and wondering why he cares. He refuses to just tell her that she looks prettier without them.

 

She asks what he’s going to do about So-yoon’s father, expecting him to charge him properly for his crimes. But to her shock, Jae-chan says the case is already closed and his brother was saved, so that’s that.

She can’t believe he’s planning to let it go just because of his caseload and his fear of getting fired, but Jae-chan whines that he has three years left on payments for a car he wrecked because of her. She rattles off a string of numbers in response, telling him that they’re this week’s lottery numbers.

He scoffs, insulted that she thinks he’d decide what to say or do based on how much money he had. He leaves in a huff, and once he’s gone, she swoons at his response.

Jae-chan runs into Yoo-bum, who offers to buy him lunch now that their case is closed. But Jae-chan says he hasn’t finalized the paperwork, saying that he found things that require further investigation. Yoo-bum’s temper flares at that, and he says that Jae-chan won’t find anything no matter how much he digs.

Yoo-bum says he knows Jae-chan’s every move, and Jae-chan replies, “Do you know what’s scarier than not knowing? Thinking you know everything.”

Jae-chan’s smile fades into an icy glare and he stalks off… only to hide behind a car around the corner, wondering why he went and said such a thing. He tries to calm his racing heart and repeats Hong-joo’s lottery numbers to himself, ha.

Jae-chan arrives at the office just in time to stop the paperwork from being delivered to his boss, and he grabs So-yoon’s father’s case file to restart the investigation. The chief prosecutor notes this and calls him in, and Jae-chan chants the lotto numbers on the way like it’s a prayer.

The boss tells him to close the case, accusing him of digging his heels in because of his personal grudge against Yoo-bum. Jae-chan says it’s okay if the chief prosecutor thinks that, as long as he can stop this case from returning to them in the future as an even bigger crime. He vows to reexamine all of the past charges against So-yoon’s father.

The boss loses his temper, and the gossip spreads rapidly. The other prosecutors wonder if Jae-chan won the lotto or something, to make him act out like this.

 

Jae-chan test-drives a shiny new car later that day, and he stops to brag to Hong-joo about reopening the case. She beams proudly and wonders why he argued when he was going to do the right thing anyway, and then gasps when she sees the car. “You’re not… buying that because of those lotto numbers I lied about, are you?” she asks nervously.

Jae-chan tries not to let the shock show on his face, and lies that he totally knew she was kidding. She asks if he restarted the case because of the lotto numbers, and he reminds her that he’s not the kind of person to let money determine his actions.

He trips over his own feet on his way back to the car, and tells the salesman in a deflated voice that he’ll buy the car… someday.

 

Fellow prosecutor Hee-min jumps when she gets caught gossiping about Jae-chan, not realizing that he was brooding in the dark room over his worthless lottery ticket, which he rips up.

He asks her about So-yoon’s father, as she was the one who dropped the case the last time he was charged. Hee-min says she doesn’t regret it, because domestic violence cases aren’t so cut and dry, and the choice should be up to the victim. Them indicting the husband is passing judgment on a situation they don’t understand, she says, and not knowing the difference between justice and acting brave means that he doesn’t have the right to be a prosecutor.

Jae-chan looks down at his ID tag as he thinks over her words, and the camera spins around him and takes us back to that rainy day 13 years ago. I love the transitions in this drama.

Inside a convenience store, Jae-chan had asked Dad what he wanted him to grow up to be. Before he could answer, a soldier had entered the store, and Dad noticed it right away—the nasty end of a large rifle, sticking out of the duffle bag on his shoulder.

Dad asked Jae-chan to run home and fetch his cell phone, saying that he’d forgotten it, and on his way out, Dad stopped him to answer, “A prosecutor. I’d have no other wishes if you became a prosecutor.” Jae-chan agreed on the spot and stepped outside with the umbrella that his father had just bought him.

Dad’s smile faded as he looked behind him at the soldier, the same young man who got on Hong-joo’s father’s bus in her flashback. Later this very day, in fact.

Jae-chan was waiting to cross the street when he heard the sound of gunshots, stopping him cold. He turned around as the soldier fled the scene, everything happening in slow motion.

He ran inside to find Dad bleeding on the ground, and broke down in tears.

 

As we see the other half of the funeral for the people killed by that solider, Jae-chan narrates, “I knew it then, that my father had made a choice. He sacrificed himself to save other people, and the world called him a hero. But through that choice, my mother lost a husband, and Seung-won and I lost a father. Rather than feeling proud, I resented that choice. To the world, my father’s choice was justice, but to me, it was just acting brave.”

Back in the present, Jae-chan comes out of his reverie to find Woo-tak staring at him in wonder. He introduces himself as the guy from the Valentine’s Day accident, and offers to buy Jae-chan dinner to thank him. They find out that they’re the same age, and Woo-tak suggests banmal but Jae-chan shuts him down, ha.

So-yoon helps out at Hong-joo’s restaurant, clearly feeling bad about imposing but not willing to admit it. Hong-joo says she’s a lot like someone else she knows, thinking of Jae-chan’s habit of speaking badly when he’s nice at heart.

Seung-won grabs the dishes out of So-yoon’s hands and barks at Hong-joo, calling her “ajumma,” and sniping that a pianist can’t get her hands hurt. He throws in a little wink at So-yoon for good measure, making her smile.

Woo-tak leads Jae-chan to Hong-joo’s restaurant, surprised to run into her again. Wait, is this really a coincidence? No way…

Woo-tak says he regretted not asking her name the other night when he gave her a ride, and she agrees to use banmal when she finds out that they’re the same age. Woo-tak says very easily that she looks prettier without her glasses and jokes that they’re the Three Flying Dragons, since they were all born in the year of the dragon, and Jae-chan looks annoyed that Hong-joo is so friendly and giggly with Woo-tak.

At the same time, Yoo-bum finds out where So-yoon and her mother are hiding and turns his car around.

Seung-won is the one who ends up serving Woo-tak and Jae-chan, slamming the dishes onto the table with a whole lot of emotion behind it. Jae-chan snaps that he told him not to get involved in So-yoon’s life, and Seung-won just ignores him.

Woo-tak says he expected them to be very affectionate brothers, and Jae-chan is surprised that he knows they’re brothers. He guesses that this isn’t a coincidence, and Woo-tak says that’s what he’s curious about—whether it’s coincidence or fate. He grabs Jae-chan’s hand as he says it, ha, making it look like a very different conversation.

Woo-tak wonders to himself if things will really happen according to his dream, in which he’d come to this restaurant with his partner, and run into Jae-chan by chance on the way. He looks around and notes that everything else is the same, except he changed one small thing—he brought Jae-chan here instead of his partner.

Jae-chan asks him to stop playing around and admit that this isn’t a coincidence, but Woo-tak holds up his hand and thinks that if his dream is right, someone will walk through the door in five seconds. He counts down, and Yoo-bum walks in right on cue.

Hong-joo steps in front of So-yoon and her mother protectively, and Yoo-bum says he’s not here to see her tonight, but to speak to his client’s family.

Woo-tak gapes to see everything happen the way he’d seen it in his dream, and tells Jae-chan that it’s definitely fate, and not coincidence.

Woo-tak thinks to himself, “I’m curious to know if the one trivial thing I changed will be able to stop the horrible thing that’s about to happen.”

 

EPILOGUE

The episode closes with a shot of Jae-chan’s father’s columbarium, which fills with pictures of his family in the same way that Hong-joo’s father’s did. Among them are Jae-chan’s real report cards and all the selfies he takes, like the one showing off his prosecutor’s badge.

COMMENTS

Even with today’s movie-title-as-episode-title, “Covertly, Grandly,” I wasn’t expecting Woo-tak to be a seer hiding in our midst. I thought maybe Woo-tak would turn out to be evil, not a fellow dream-seer! That was a great twist, and I’m excited by what this could mean for the larger story, since we now know that the premonitions aren’t limited to our leads. I’m still not convinced that he’s entirely good—I mean, he seems like a very nice cop, but then he has these moments where his motivations feel purposely ambiguous. In any case, it’s starting to look like he’s a possible love interest, and a very big slice of the mystery pie. Did he start having these dreams recently, like Jae-chan did? Does it have to do with their proximity to Hong-joo, or something else? And if Jae-chan and Hong-joo are connected through the deaths of their fathers, how does Woo-tak figure into this? Is he connected to another victim, or maybe the soldier? It can’t be coincidence that all three of them are the same age, either.

Jae-chan definitely got the more moving backstory, but it’s because of how good his father was (why are all good drama parents destined to die?). After their argument at the police station, I wasn’t expecting such a sweet father-son relationship, with Dad sticking up for him and taking the brunt of the punishment from Mom for his sake. I can see now why Jae-chan is so eager to fulfill his father’s last wish at all costs, and also why he’s reluctant to risk himself to save others. But it’s just in his nature to end up doing it anyway, because you can’t grow up with a father like that and not be good at heart.

I loved that Little Bro was a sassypants as a kid too; he seems to have taken over Mom’s role in being Jae-chan’s moral compass, and it’s great (and entertaining) that he will point out just how much of a dumbass his brother is being. Of course, he has the luxury of thinking in absolutes because he’s not worried about the rent or accidentally having killed a man in everyone’s dreams. But Jae-chan was clearly in need of a wakeup call if he thought his father wanted him to become a prosecutor in name and not actually do a good job of upholding justice. The lottery bit was funny, but it also spoke to the heart of the problem, both in him and in the system—that he really was hampered from doing what he thought was right for fear of losing his job. It seems ridiculous that pursuing one case means risking your neck, but I suppose there’s a small hope in that too, that all it takes is one stubborn prosecutor to keep a case alive.

The opening sequence was definitely the highlight of the episode, with everyone racing to the same place to stop a disaster from happening, and such personal stakes in preventing it. That’s what’s kept the premonitions really riveting thus far—because they’re connected to our main characters on a personal level, which keeps the urgency and our investment very high. I hope that continues to be the case in every episode, even if it’s a terrible thing to do, putting all our characters in one place, foretelling imminent disaster, and leaving us hanging. That’s just mean.

While You Were Sleeping

While You Were Sleeping

While You Were Sleeping Title: 당신이 잠든 사이에/While You Were Sleeping Chinese Title: 當你沉睡時 Classification: Fantasy, Legal, Romance Scenes: 32 (35 minutes/scene) Communicate organize: SBS Communicate period: 2017-Sep-27 to 2017-Nov-16 Broadcast appointment: Wednesday and Thursday 22:00 (2 scenes consecutive) Synopsis This is a pre-delivered show. Taping started on 2017-Feb and completed 2017-July. The show is about a lady, Name Hong …

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