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While You Were Sleeping Episode 4 Recap





EPISODE 4

Pianist So-yoon runs to school in the rain. She’s a high school student and Little Bro is her classmate, and he runs up to her to ask after her mom. She coldly reminds him not to act like they know each other, but he says he was just worried about her.

He takes off his coat and puts it around her shoulders, sweetly pulling up the hood to shield her from the rain. She asks what his name is, and he gapes and says they’ve been in the same class for two years. She doesn’t see why that means she should know his name, and runs off grinning. Dude, are they trolling us? (Little Bro doesn’t have a name—he’s literally “Jae-chan’s little brother” in the credits.)

Jae-chan sighs when another ginormous stack of case files arrives at his office, and office manager Hyang-mi implies that he’s slow to close cases compared to the other prosecutors. Investigator Chief Choi is more concerned with Jae-chan picking the right restaurant for the staff lunch, saying that it can be more important than his case record in the eyes of his superiors.

Jae-chan goes running to hoobae Hee-min for help, only to be squarely ignored when he calls after her, again in banmal. Yoo-bum is there with the chief prosecutor, and he tells Jae-chan that she outranks him now, so he should be addressing her formally by her title.

When Jae-chan says he was going to ask her advice on picking a restaurant, Yoo-bum rattles off a list of all the prosecutors’ varying tastes like a know-it-all. He reaches up to pat Jae-chan on the head in his usual patronizing way, but this time Jae-chan grabs his arm and stops him, which the chief prosecutor finds rude. Yoo-bum plays it off, but senses the animosity from Jae-chan.

On the bus, the daughter grows more and more anxious that all these passengers could die. Dad quietly tells her that he’ll pull over and make everyone get off the bus, citing mechanical failure.

While keeping an eye on the suspicious soldier, Dad pulls over and asks everyone to take the next bus because of a flat tire, and motions for his daughter to go with them. She hurries everyone away to safety and then breaks down in tears as she looks back at the bus with just Dad and the soldier still on it.

Dad smiles at her reassuringly and then asks the soldier to help him change the flat tire, but the agitated soldier tries to fight his way past Dad instead. In the struggle, the bomb in his duffle goes off, setting the bus ablaze. The daughter falls to her knees, crying out for her father.

Hong-joo wakes up from another dream in tears, and writes down the details: “Seung-won becomes a murderer because of his hyung.” She doesn’t know who Seung-won is, or why he becomes a killer. Aaack, please don’t let it be who I think it is…

She adds the post-it to her wall of dream notes, but then remembers Jae-chan telling her to ignore her dreams if she can’t handle them, and throws that one in the trash.

At school, Little Bro storms up to pianist So-yoon in front of all her friends, demanding to talk. She takes him to the gym and starts hitting him for not keeping his promise, but he shouts that he saw her doing an internet search on killing your own family members. Wow, that went dark fast.

He asks why she would do such a thing, guessing right away that she intends to kill her father. She bites back that she’s trying to save her mother, but he argues that her father will be punished by the law.

She says her father will never face trial, “because prosecutors are stupid and lawyers are savage.” She knows exactly how the lawyer will reduce the charge, and we see it play out just as she describes, as Yoo-bum brings new evidence into Jae-chan’s office indicating that her mother’s injuries were from skiing, days before the concert.

Little Bro says that her mother could still press charges, but she knows her mother will never do that because she’s more afraid of her father than the law. Sure enough, her mother tells Jae-chan over the phone that she was injured from a skiing accident.

Jae-chan scoffs at the phone and tells Yoo-bum that he gets it now—that this is how Yoo-bum makes crimes go away and how he turns clients into regulars. Oh snap.

Yoo-bum asks why Jae-chan is holding such a grudge over what happened thirteen years ago, which he thinks is the only explanation for why Jae-chan made a move on his girlfriend, rammed into his car, and is now making a fuss over an open-and-shut case.

Jae-chan’s staff gapes and Hyang-mi starts spreading the gossip right away, which spreads like wildfire through each team’s office manager. Yoo-bum has the brass to tell Jae-chan to do things according to the law, and tells him to stop acting like an immature kid. I hate you.

Little Bro says that there must be some way to save her mother, but So-yoon says that old adages are always true: “That the law is always far, and fists are close.”

At the staff lunch, Jae-chan tries to wave Hee-min over to their table, which she refuses to acknowledge because he keeps speaking in banmal.

He then makes another faux pas when he tells the chief prosecutor that he’s an atheist, and has to sit there awkwardly as the rest of them join hands and pray for him in hilarious passive-aggressive fashion, calling him their lost brother, and praying for him to respect his superiors and not let personal grudges affect his work.

Their comments light a fire under his ass to at least do a good job on his cases, and he comes back from lunch with a plan to blaze through his unfinished caseload. His staff finds it so odd that they assume he’s drunk.

The bus driver is given a hero’s funeral, attended by numerous politicians and covered extensively by the press. The whole thing seems to be for show though, with reporters angling for an interview with the “son” who helped passengers off the bus.

Jae-chan has fallen asleep at his desk, and wakes up with a violent start from a nightmare. He insists that he’s fine, but he’s woken up in tears.

He goes over the dream, which is short but heartbreaking: Little Bro being escorted away in the back of a police car in handcuffs, crying for Hyung to save him because he didn’t do it. Noooooooooo, not the brother, goddammit!

He calls Little Bro, who’s still at school, and makes sure that he’s okay and not hurt. Jae-chan tells him to go straight home without stopping anywhere, and Little Bro brushes off his concern, and then looks out the window to see So-yoon leaving.

Jae-chan tells himself that it was nothing but a bad dream, but then he remembers another detail: Hong-joo in the distance, shedding a tear and saying that he should’ve believed her, because then they could’ve stopped it. Also, I don’t know if he’s noticed, but he’s wearing today’s outfit in his dream…

The bus driver’s daughter crouches in an empty funeral hall and takes out Dad’s cherished baseball, charred from the fire. She thinks back to how she’d begged him to get off the bus too, promising to grow her hair long like he wished. Dad had beamed and promised to be right behind her, urging her to get everyone to safety first.

Hong-joo can’t get the last dream out of her mind, and finally fishes the post-it back out of her trashcan and sticks it back on her window.

At the bus driver’s funeral, the reporters learn that it was a daughter who was with him, not a son (I’m realizing now that we were meant to assume she was a boy this whole time, but come on). They go up to the wife to ask where her daughter is, and of course it’s Hong-joo’s mother, because this is her backstory.

Hong-joo steps outside right as Jae-chan is about to knock, and he says he’s not here because he changed his mind, but to explain why he doesn’t believe her. He says he’s a prosecutor and his job is to punish people after a crime, not stop them before they happen. He says it’s not his business who lives or dies, but…

Hong-joo interrupts, “You feel like you’ve become a catcher, right? There’s a 160-mph ball coming at you, and you’re afraid to catch it, but if you avoid it, you’ll ruin the game.” He admits it and says he can’t pretend he doesn’t see it, and asks why she passed this onto him.

She doesn’t know either, and argues that she doesn’t even know why shedreams this stuff in the first place. He says there must be a reason it’s them.

Back in Hong-joo’s flashback, someone picks up her father’s baseball and hands it to her… it’s Jae-chan, not that they ever knew.

In the present, Hong-joo asks if he just came here to blame her, but that’s when he finally says, “Help me.” Jae-chan says that he had a dream and she was in it, upset that he didn’t listen to her, “and Seung-won left in an ambulance or police car.” Gack!

She asks who Seung-won is, and he says the horrible words: “He’s my brother, why?” af$gik&#%@!

Hong-joo tells him that in her dream, Seung-won killed a person, and said that it was all because of his hyung.

At the same time, Seung-won stops So-yoon as she’s about to reach for a bottle of antifreeze at the store. She’s startled, while he just notes happily that she remembers his name now.

She asks if he followed her here, and he holds onto her hand and just says brightly that he’ll take her home.

COMMENTS

No, not the little brother! Oh man, if he becomes a murderer all because they messed with Fate to save Hong-joo and her mom… I mean, how can they keep changing the future if the consequences are this drastic? Why the heck is Fate so bloodthirsty? Maybe it would’ve happened anyway and this new dream has nothing to do with the future they changed, but it seems that we’re meant to believe that all of these events are related and a direct consequence of their actions. And since they’re not traveling through time and the world stays changed once it’s changed (that we know of), there’s no telling how many ripple effects that one shift could cause down the line.

It’s scarier this way, since each choice causes permanent, irreparable damage—but it also gives more weight to their actions, making it less like a fantasy and much more like reality. Every choice is something they have to take responsibility for, and that makes me far more cautious about how they should intervene in other people’s lives, even though I know they’ll do everything in their power to save people, because they’re good. Also weird, but good.

I was surprised again when Jae-chan had another dream premonition, which likely means that he’ll continue to have them, and that he and Hong-joo will be two pieces of a puzzle on every case. It still leaves so many questions about why he’s suddenly having the dreams too, but perhaps they’re connected through their fathers’ deaths, or maybe it’s as simple as fate. I do think we were meant to be more surprised that the bus driver and his daughter turned out to be Hong-joo and her dad, but it was so obvious from the start that I was actually confused when they revealed her mother like it was supposed to be dramatic, and realized that the past scenes were seamless with the present ones for a reason. The rainy day in present and past alike worked nicely to make it appear as though it wasn’t a flashback, but maybe they shouldn’t have mentioned Hong-joo’s father at all before this if they really wanted to pull one over on us.

On the upside, it’s interesting to note that not all of Hong-joo’s dreams are terrible tragedies, as I had initially thought, and that she also has mundane premonitions, like Jae-chan’s morning commute. I can see this coming in handy once the romance gets going, and I hope this means he’ll get happy premonitions too. At present, Hong-joo’s delusions about him falling for her are hilarious and I want that to keep going (and going), but it would crack me up if Jae-chan started dreaming about her romantically before he developed feelings for her. If the drama continues to be this cleverly directed and witty, I could get really invested in this romance, really fast.

Seeing Shin Jae-ha and Kim So-hyun playing high-schoolers together just made me want the 16-episode drama where they’re the main characters. Seriously, can’t they just remake Page Turner as a full-length drama after this one? I really hope that her cameo is long and doesn’t end with her ruining his life. I mean, he JUST got a name! Let us wear it out a little! Please…?

EPISODE 4

Pianist So-yoon runs to school in the rain. She’s a high school student and Little Bro is her classmate, and he runs up to her to ask after her mom. She coldly reminds him not to act like they know each other, but he says he was just worried about her.

He takes off his coat and puts it around her shoulders, sweetly pulling up the hood to shield her from the rain. She asks what his name is, and he gapes and says they’ve been in the same class for two years. She doesn’t see why that means she should know his name, and runs off grinning. Dude, are they trolling us? (Little Bro doesn’t have a name—he’s literally “Jae-chan’s little brother” in the credits.)

Jae-chan sighs when another ginormous stack of case files arrives at his office, and office manager Hyang-mi implies that he’s slow to close cases compared to the other prosecutors. Investigator Chief Choi is more concerned with Jae-chan picking the right restaurant for the staff lunch, saying that it can be more important than his case record in the eyes of his superiors.

Jae-chan goes running to hoobae Hee-min for help, only to be squarely ignored when he calls after her, again in banmal. Yoo-bum is there with the chief prosecutor, and he tells Jae-chan that she outranks him now, so he should be addressing her formally by her title.

When Jae-chan says he was going to ask her advice on picking a restaurant, Yoo-bum rattles off a list of all the prosecutors’ varying tastes like a know-it-all. He reaches up to pat Jae-chan on the head in his usual patronizing way, but this time Jae-chan grabs his arm and stops him, which the chief prosecutor finds rude. Yoo-bum plays it off, but senses the animosity from Jae-chan.

On the bus, the daughter grows more and more anxious that all these passengers could die. Dad quietly tells her that he’ll pull over and make everyone get off the bus, citing mechanical failure.

While keeping an eye on the suspicious soldier, Dad pulls over and asks everyone to take the next bus because of a flat tire, and motions for his daughter to go with them. She hurries everyone away to safety and then breaks down in tears as she looks back at the bus with just Dad and the soldier still on it.

Dad smiles at her reassuringly and then asks the soldier to help him change the flat tire, but the agitated soldier tries to fight his way past Dad instead. In the struggle, the bomb in his duffle goes off, setting the bus ablaze. The daughter falls to her knees, crying out for her father.

Hong-joo wakes up from another dream in tears, and writes down the details: “Seung-won becomes a murderer because of his hyung.” She doesn’t know who Seung-won is, or why he becomes a killer. Aaack, please don’t let it be who I think it is…

She adds the post-it to her wall of dream notes, but then remembers Jae-chan telling her to ignore her dreams if she can’t handle them, and throws that one in the trash.

At school, Little Bro storms up to pianist So-yoon in front of all her friends, demanding to talk. She takes him to the gym and starts hitting him for not keeping his promise, but he shouts that he saw her doing an internet search on killing your own family members. Wow, that went dark fast.

He asks why she would do such a thing, guessing right away that she intends to kill her father. She bites back that she’s trying to save her mother, but he argues that her father will be punished by the law.

She says her father will never face trial, “because prosecutors are stupid and lawyers are savage.” She knows exactly how the lawyer will reduce the charge, and we see it play out just as she describes, as Yoo-bum brings new evidence into Jae-chan’s office indicating that her mother’s injuries were from skiing, days before the concert.

Little Bro says that her mother could still press charges, but she knows her mother will never do that because she’s more afraid of her father than the law. Sure enough, her mother tells Jae-chan over the phone that she was injured from a skiing accident.

Jae-chan scoffs at the phone and tells Yoo-bum that he gets it now—that this is how Yoo-bum makes crimes go away and how he turns clients into regulars. Oh snap.

Yoo-bum asks why Jae-chan is holding such a grudge over what happened thirteen years ago, which he thinks is the only explanation for why Jae-chan made a move on his girlfriend, rammed into his car, and is now making a fuss over an open-and-shut case.

Jae-chan’s staff gapes and Hyang-mi starts spreading the gossip right away, which spreads like wildfire through each team’s office manager. Yoo-bum has the brass to tell Jae-chan to do things according to the law, and tells him to stop acting like an immature kid. I hate you.

Little Bro says that there must be some way to save her mother, but So-yoon says that old adages are always true: “That the law is always far, and fists are close.”

At the staff lunch, Jae-chan tries to wave Hee-min over to their table, which she refuses to acknowledge because he keeps speaking in banmal.

He then makes another faux pas when he tells the chief prosecutor that he’s an atheist, and has to sit there awkwardly as the rest of them join hands and pray for him in hilarious passive-aggressive fashion, calling him their lost brother, and praying for him to respect his superiors and not let personal grudges affect his work.

Their comments light a fire under his ass to at least do a good job on his cases, and he comes back from lunch with a plan to blaze through his unfinished caseload. His staff finds it so odd that they assume he’s drunk.

The bus driver is given a hero’s funeral, attended by numerous politicians and covered extensively by the press. The whole thing seems to be for show though, with reporters angling for an interview with the “son” who helped passengers off the bus.

Jae-chan has fallen asleep at his desk, and wakes up with a violent start from a nightmare. He insists that he’s fine, but he’s woken up in tears.

He goes over the dream, which is short but heartbreaking: Little Bro being escorted away in the back of a police car in handcuffs, crying for Hyung to save him because he didn’t do it. Noooooooooo, not the brother, goddammit!

He calls Little Bro, who’s still at school, and makes sure that he’s okay and not hurt. Jae-chan tells him to go straight home without stopping anywhere, and Little Bro brushes off his concern, and then looks out the window to see So-yoon leaving.

Jae-chan tells himself that it was nothing but a bad dream, but then he remembers another detail: Hong-joo in the distance, shedding a tear and saying that he should’ve believed her, because then they could’ve stopped it. Also, I don’t know if he’s noticed, but he’s wearing today’s outfit in his dream…

The bus driver’s daughter crouches in an empty funeral hall and takes out Dad’s cherished baseball, charred from the fire. She thinks back to how she’d begged him to get off the bus too, promising to grow her hair long like he wished. Dad had beamed and promised to be right behind her, urging her to get everyone to safety first.

Hong-joo can’t get the last dream out of her mind, and finally fishes the post-it back out of her trashcan and sticks it back on her window.

At the bus driver’s funeral, the reporters learn that it was a daughter who was with him, not a son (I’m realizing now that we were meant to assume she was a boy this whole time, but come on). They go up to the wife to ask where her daughter is, and of course it’s Hong-joo’s mother, because this is her backstory.

Hong-joo steps outside right as Jae-chan is about to knock, and he says he’s not here because he changed his mind, but to explain why he doesn’t believe her. He says he’s a prosecutor and his job is to punish people after a crime, not stop them before they happen. He says it’s not his business who lives or dies, but…

Hong-joo interrupts, “You feel like you’ve become a catcher, right? There’s a 160-mph ball coming at you, and you’re afraid to catch it, but if you avoid it, you’ll ruin the game.” He admits it and says he can’t pretend he doesn’t see it, and asks why she passed this onto him.

She doesn’t know either, and argues that she doesn’t even know why shedreams this stuff in the first place. He says there must be a reason it’s them.

Back in Hong-joo’s flashback, someone picks up her father’s baseball and hands it to her… it’s Jae-chan, not that they ever knew.

In the present, Hong-joo asks if he just came here to blame her, but that’s when he finally says, “Help me.” Jae-chan says that he had a dream and she was in it, upset that he didn’t listen to her, “and Seung-won left in an ambulance or police car.” Gack!

She asks who Seung-won is, and he says the horrible words: “He’s my brother, why?” af$gik&#%@!

Hong-joo tells him that in her dream, Seung-won killed a person, and said that it was all because of his hyung.

At the same time, Seung-won stops So-yoon as she’s about to reach for a bottle of antifreeze at the store. She’s startled, while he just notes happily that she remembers his name now.

She asks if he followed her here, and he holds onto her hand and just says brightly that he’ll take her home.

COMMENTS

No, not the little brother! Oh man, if he becomes a murderer all because they messed with Fate to save Hong-joo and her mom… I mean, how can they keep changing the future if the consequences are this drastic? Why the heck is Fate so bloodthirsty? Maybe it would’ve happened anyway and this new dream has nothing to do with the future they changed, but it seems that we’re meant to believe that all of these events are related and a direct consequence of their actions. And since they’re not traveling through time and the world stays changed once it’s changed (that we know of), there’s no telling how many ripple effects that one shift could cause down the line.

It’s scarier this way, since each choice causes permanent, irreparable damage—but it also gives more weight to their actions, making it less like a fantasy and much more like reality. Every choice is something they have to take responsibility for, and that makes me far more cautious about how they should intervene in other people’s lives, even though I know they’ll do everything in their power to save people, because they’re good. Also weird, but good.

I was surprised again when Jae-chan had another dream premonition, which likely means that he’ll continue to have them, and that he and Hong-joo will be two pieces of a puzzle on every case. It still leaves so many questions about why he’s suddenly having the dreams too, but perhaps they’re connected through their fathers’ deaths, or maybe it’s as simple as fate. I do think we were meant to be more surprised that the bus driver and his daughter turned out to be Hong-joo and her dad, but it was so obvious from the start that I was actually confused when they revealed her mother like it was supposed to be dramatic, and realized that the past scenes were seamless with the present ones for a reason. The rainy day in present and past alike worked nicely to make it appear as though it wasn’t a flashback, but maybe they shouldn’t have mentioned Hong-joo’s father at all before this if they really wanted to pull one over on us.

On the upside, it’s interesting to note that not all of Hong-joo’s dreams are terrible tragedies, as I had initially thought, and that she also has mundane premonitions, like Jae-chan’s morning commute. I can see this coming in handy once the romance gets going, and I hope this means he’ll get happy premonitions too. At present, Hong-joo’s delusions about him falling for her are hilarious and I want that to keep going (and going), but it would crack me up if Jae-chan started dreaming about her romantically before he developed feelings for her. If the drama continues to be this cleverly directed and witty, I could get really invested in this romance, really fast.

Seeing Shin Jae-ha and Kim So-hyun playing high-schoolers together just made me want the 16-episode drama where they’re the main characters. Seriously, can’t they just remake Page Turner as a full-length drama after this one? I really hope that her cameo is long and doesn’t end with her ruining his life. I mean, he JUST got a name! Let us wear it out a little! Please…?

While You Were Sleeping

While You Were Sleeping

While You Were Sleeping Title: 당신이 잠든 사이에/While You Were Sleeping Chinese Title: 當你沉睡時 Classification: Fantasy, Legal, Romance Scenes: 32 (35 minutes/scene) Communicate organize: SBS Communicate period: 2017-Sep-27 to 2017-Nov-16 Broadcast appointment: Wednesday and Thursday 22:00 (2 scenes consecutive) Synopsis This is a pre-delivered show. Taping started on 2017-Feb and completed 2017-July. The show is about a lady, Name Hong …

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